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Nature says leave them alone

Candlelight.kk
Candlelight.kk
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Posts : 3068
Location : London
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Nature says leave them alone Empty Nature says leave them alone

Post by Candlelight.kk on Thu 11 May 2017, 01:39

11 Jun 2008, 7:44 am

pa.press.net
Wednesday, 11 June 2008

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Call to leave baby birds alone

People who spot newly-fledged baby birds which seem to have been abandoned by their parents have been urged not to try to help them.

Although nature lovers may feel the urge to intervene to assist the dishevelled and distressed chicks the RSPB warned they may end up killing them with kindness.

The charity said it gets numerous calls each day from concerned gardeners at this time of year who have seen baby birds alone and vulnerable outside, and are worried about predators and the weather.

And with gardens full of scruffy little chicks as the breeding season comes to an end, many people feel they should be helping by putting them back into nests or moving them to higher places.

But the RSPB said adult birds rarely abandon their young completely and they must be left alone to learn to fly, feed and survive on their own.

Human intervention could lead to the adults abandoning their chicks for real, and make them reluctant to nest in the same garden again, the conservation charity warned.

Val Osborne, head of wildlife inquiries at the RSPB, said: "It can be painful to watch as the chicks hatch and fend for themselves for the first time but you must let nature take its course.

"They will be chirping like crazy and look and sound quite distressed but this is all part of the natural process of a young bird learning to fly, feed and survive on its own."

Gardener Bryan Bland said: "There are so many baby birds in my garden at the moment and when you see them on their own, desperately searching for their parents it can be heartbreaking. But parents will rarely completely abandon their chicks and will always be close by, returning to them at the end of the day.

"We may think we are helping by trying to put them back into nests or moving them to higher places but we must leave them alone."

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It's a problem I'm very much faced with at this time of the year, where the cats are concerned.

I'm so pleased to read this :
"They will be chirping like crazy and look and sound quite distressed but this is all part of the natural process of a young bird learning to fly, feed and survive on its own."
because I had always thought that sound (heard a lot this time of year) was one of distress. Once when I found a little baby bird in the garden, so tiny hadn't even full formed its feathers - not only was it making these distressing sounds, but all around was the incessant, urgent screeching which I am sure was the worried sound of a parent(s). I made a makeshift little shelter, with entrance only large enough for a bird to enter/exit and did (as mentioned in this article) put it up high - so as to keep out of reach of the cats, but easily accessible to its mum. That little box had regular visitors (birds) non-stop for two whole days I watched this, and wasn't always the same bird visiting. On the third day when I checked out the box was empty.
lar-lar
lar-lar

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Nature says leave them alone Empty Re: Nature says leave them alone

Post by lar-lar on Thu 11 May 2017, 01:42

12 Jun 2008, 12:36 am

Has anybody been watching Springwatch?A most enjoyable programme with a variety of nesting birds.

The most upsetting sounds i have heard from birds is when they have been in my cats mouth.Three of them to be precise,one killed and i wrenched the jaws open to save the other two..not all at once..on different occasions.

I also found one in the street with an obvious broken wing,took it home and the rspca took it away,poor thing.I really love birds.
Brian
Brian

Posts : 46
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Job/hobbies : Artist and musician

Nature says leave them alone Empty Re: Nature says leave them alone

Post by Brian on Sat 26 May 2018, 11:46

It's heartbreaking and nature can appear cruel at times but yeah, you can do more harm than good by interfering.



Always looking for my new best friend
mac
mac

Posts : 882
Location : east midlands of England
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Nature says leave them alone Empty Re: Nature says leave them alone

Post by mac on Sat 26 May 2018, 12:04

My wife and I both love cats and have had them for many years in the past although not presently.  I used to have a real downer on them because of their predation on garden birds but recently I heard a bird expert declaring that although they do take birds, often it's the sickly ones.  That may well be so but it breaks my heart when fledglings are caught and eaten shortly after they learn to fly. 

I remain unpersuaded about cats' habits tending to think they do more harm than they ought to be allowed to.  It might be nature for cats to hunt the way they do but they're not native to our islands and it's we humans who brought them here and allow them free rein. 

Maybe they need to be confined to a small garden or even indoor area rather than their being allowed to move freely wherever they choose?
Brian
Brian

Posts : 46
Location : Sweden
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Job/hobbies : Artist and musician

Nature says leave them alone Empty Re: Nature says leave them alone

Post by Brian on Sat 26 May 2018, 12:07

mac wrote:
I remain unpersuaded about cats' habits tending to think they do more harm than they ought to be allowed to.
I tend to agree.  If I owned a cat I would probably use a bell collar to warn the birds.



Always looking for my new best friend
mac
mac

Posts : 882
Location : east midlands of England
Points : 2129
Job/hobbies : retired

Nature says leave them alone Empty Re: Nature says leave them alone

Post by mac on Sat 26 May 2018, 12:11

Brian wrote:
mac wrote:
I remain unpersuaded about cats' habits tending to think they do more harm than they ought to be allowed to.
I tend to agree.  If I owned a cat I would probably use a bell collar to warn the birds.
It's the youngest birds who are still at risk and even mature birds get caught when there's cover for the cat to lie in and pounce - even when they're wearing a bell....
Brian
Brian

Posts : 46
Location : Sweden
Points : 849
Job/hobbies : Artist and musician

Nature says leave them alone Empty Re: Nature says leave them alone

Post by Brian on Sat 26 May 2018, 12:13

mac wrote:
Brian wrote:
mac wrote:
I remain unpersuaded about cats' habits tending to think they do more harm than they ought to be allowed to.
I tend to agree.  If I owned a cat I would probably use a bell collar to warn the birds.
It's the youngest birds who are still at risk and even mature birds get caught when there's cover for the cat to lie in and pounce....
What does one do then?  I love cats but I don't think I could ever have one because of this.  I hate to see struggling, frightened animals.



Always looking for my new best friend
mac
mac

Posts : 882
Location : east midlands of England
Points : 2129
Job/hobbies : retired

Nature says leave them alone Empty Re: Nature says leave them alone

Post by mac on Sat 26 May 2018, 12:16

Brian wrote:
mac wrote:
Brian wrote:
mac wrote:
I remain unpersuaded about cats' habits tending to think they do more harm than they ought to be allowed to.
I tend to agree.  If I owned a cat I would probably use a bell collar to warn the birds.
It's the youngest birds who are still at risk and even mature birds get caught when there's cover for the cat to lie in and pounce....
What does one do then?  I love cats but I don't think I could ever have one because of this.  I hate to see struggling, frightened animals.
You don't allow them total freedom....
Candlelight.kk
Candlelight.kk
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Location : London
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Nature says leave them alone Empty Re: Nature says leave them alone

Post by Candlelight.kk on Sat 26 May 2018, 14:14

Brian wrote:
mac wrote:
I remain unpersuaded about cats' habits tending to think they do more harm than they ought to be allowed to.
I tend to agree.  If I owned a cat I would probably use a bell collar to warn the birds.

At one time, I got one of those for one of my cats to wear (I actually got two - one for each of them, but trying get Poppy to wear a collar - with or without bell - was an impossible task.)

So Pepsi had one on for a time. You could hear him tinkling wherever he went.
BUT ... he somehow managed this technique whereby when he was ready to pounce, he deliberately moved in such a way that the bell was kept perfectly steady and would not make a sound. The rest of the time you would hear him coming a mile away!
I watched him once sitting on the fence in the garden, stalking his intended prey, a little bird happily hopping around the place, oblivious to his intended fate. Pepsi stayed so still, perched up on the fence - not moving a muscle - for an absolute age. There was about 10 ft between himself and the unsuspecting bird - and whatever way he fixed it, he began to move towards the birdie in a sort of slow motion, his head not moving, and never once taking his eyes off the bird - and all the time having to keep a balance on top of the fence(!) - not a sound came from that bell. Had I not intercepted at the last couple of steps, that poor little tweeter would've been a goner. With his conquest moment lost, he (Pepsi) immediately went straight back to tinkling his bell again with every move.

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