Light After Life

Exploring the mysteries of Life, Death and Beyond. Afterlife, Mediumship, Spiritualism: Death is not the end; I am but waiting for you for an interval ...

No judgement

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Candlelight.kk
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No judgement

Post by Candlelight.kk on Fri 19 May 2017, 3:39 pm

14 Sep 2014, 12:33

Everything in life holds both a blessing and a curse. We deny this when we label the events of our lives as either good or bad.
The following old Zen story illustrates this lesson most effectively.

A farmer had a horse but one day, the horse ran away and so the farmer and his son had to plow their fields themselves. Their neighbours said, "Oh, what bad luck that your horse ran away!" But the farmer replied, "Bad luck, good luck, who knows?"

The next week, the horse returned to the farm, bringing a herd of wild horses with him. "What wonderful luck!" cried the neighbours, but the farmer responded, "Good luck, bad luck, who knows?"

Then, the farmer's son was thrown as he tried to ride one of the wild horses, and he broke his leg. "Ah, such bad luck," sympathized the neighbours. Once again, the farmer responded, "Bad luck, good luck, who knows?"

A short time later, the ruler of the country recruited all young men to join his army for battle. The son, with his broken leg, was left at home. "What good luck that your son was not forced into battle!" celebrated the neighbors. And the farmer remarked, "Good luck, bad luck, who knows?"


"Do not judge, and you will never be mistaken."
-- Jean Jacques Rousseau

mac
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Re: No judgement

Post by mac on Fri 19 May 2017, 3:40 pm

14 Sep 2014, 16:51

I aspire not to judge others but I still do.  sadface Better, perhaps, to try but sometimes fail than never to try at all?
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Misty
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Re: No judgement

Post by Misty on Fri 19 May 2017, 3:41 pm

17 Sep 2014, 11:24

It's Yin and Yang, isn't it. Making up the circle.

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Re: No judgement

Post by mac on Fri 19 May 2017, 3:43 pm

17 Sep 2014, 11:46
Misty wrote:
It's Yin and Yang, isn't it. Making up the circle.

I don't know anything about them...
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Re: No judgement

Post by Misty on Fri 19 May 2017, 3:47 pm

17 Sep 2014, 12:04

mac wrote:

Misty wrote:
It's Yin and Yang, isn't it. Making up the circle.

I don't know anything about them...

Yin and yang
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In Chinese philosophy, yin and yang, which are often shortened to "yin-yang" or "yin yang", are concepts used to describe how apparently opposite or contrary forces are actually complementary,[Note 1] interconnected and interdependent in the natural world, and how they give rise to each other as they interrelate to one another. Many tangible dualities (such as light and dark, high and low, hot and cold, fire and water, life and death, male and female, sun and moon, and so on) are thought of as physical manifestations of the duality of yin and yang. This duality lies at the origins of many branches of classical Chinese science and philosophy, as well as being a primary guideline of traditional Chinese medicine,[1] and a central principle of different forms of Chinese martial arts and exercise, such as baguazhang, taijiquan (t'ai chi), and qigong (Chi Kung), as well as in the pages of the I Ching.

Yin and yang can be thought of as complementary (rather than opposing) forces that interact to form a dynamic system in which the whole is greater than the assembled parts. Everything has both yin and yang aspects, (for instance shadow cannot exist without light). Either of the two major aspects may manifest more strongly in a particular object, depending on the criterion of the observation.

In Taoist metaphysics, distinctions between good and bad, along with other dichotomous moral judgments, are perceptual, not real; so, the duality of yin and yang is an indivisible whole. In the ethics of Confucianism on the other hand, most notably in the philosophy of Dong Zhongshu (c. 2nd century BC), a moral dimension is attached to the idea of yin and yang.[2]

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